Ruth on the Issues: 2nd Amendment and Guns

The US Supreme Court in the Heller decision ruled that individuals have a Second Amendment right to possess a firearm in the home for self-defense,  and struck down the District of Columbia ban on handgun possession.  The Court made it clear that the right has limits, and certain restrictions are constitutional.  For example, prohibitions against felons and the mentally ill possessing guns, laws imposing conditions and qualification on sales, laws barring guns in sensitive places like schools and government buildings, and prohibitions against “dangerous and unusual weapons”.  The Court even stated it would “consider … prohibitions on carrying concealed weapons.” As of 2016, only 9% of cases (state and federal) with Second Amendment challenges were successful.

Among the safety measures I support are: universal background checks and a ban on military-style automatic weapons and bump stocks. I am opposed to allowing the carrying of a concealed weapon without a permit, which is now legal in NH as a result of a recently passed law. Most police chiefs were opposed to eliminating the requirement for a permit to carry concealed.  The term “constitutional carry” is a misnomer, as the US Supreme Court has never rules that there is a Second Amendment right to carry concealed.  Every indication is that the Court would uphold a permit requirement, and I would vote for such a requirement.  I would also vote to prohibit people other than law enforcement from bringing guns into courthouses (which is currently the law) and into the state legislature.

Letter to the Editor: My roots in Alton go back 80+ years; how long is long enough?

Originally published in the Laconia Daily Sun on April 28, 2020

To The Daily Sun,

The multi-pronged letter attacks against me from the fringe generally lack content, and thus require no response. As for Rick Notkin’s recent reference to suicides due to increased unemployment, I share his concern. My view concerning COVID-19 is that a few extra preventive measures in the short term may save us heartache in the long term. Of course, Mr. Notkin must undoubtedly join me in worrying about increasing gun sales during the pandemic, knowing that most successful suicide attempts are from firearms.

With regard to Steve Fiorini’s hallucinogenic stream-of-consciousness letter of April 28, it is difficult o see his point. First, he doesn’t like leaf blowers (not a topic I have ever weighed in on!); next, he is apparently from Massachusetts and lives in Laconia, but refers to Alton as if he lives there (which I do). My grandfather bought an old farmhouse in Alton in the 1930s (it is still in my family), and in 2010 I moved to my house on some adjacent land he purchased back then. So my roots in the area go back over 80 years, even older than I am.

Finally, I have never advocated for the recreation center Fiorini refers to as my “pet project.” All I ever said was that the volunteers who donated their time to the All in for Alton project (to study the feasibility of a rec center) should be complimented, rather than trashed by the likes of Steve Fiorini and his fellow naysayers.

Ruth Larson

Alton